Urinary metabolites of furan in waterpipe tobacco smokers compared to non-smokers in home settings in the US

Nada O.F. Kassem, Lisa A. Peterson, Sandy Liles, Noura O. Kassem, Flora K. Zaki, Kung Jong Lui, Karin R. Vevang, Nathan G. Dodder, Eunha Hoh, Melbourne F. Hovell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: Determine uptake of furan, a potential human carcinogen, in waterpipe tobacco (WPT) smokers in home settings. Methods: We analysed data from a US convenience sample of 50 exclusive WPT smokers, mean age 25.3 years, and 25 non-smokers, mean age 25.5 years. For WPT smokers, data were collected at a home visit by research assistants during which participants smoked one WPT head of one brand for a mean of 33.1 min in their homes. Research assistants provided and prepared a WP for participants by weighing and loading 10 g of WPT in the WP head. At the completion of the smoking session, research assistants measured the remaining WPT. Cotinine and six furan metabolites were quantified in first morning urine samples provided on 2 consecutive days for non-smokers, and on the morning of a WPT smoking session and on the following morning for smokers. Results: WPT smokers consumed a mean of 2.99 g WPT. In WPT smokers, urinary cotinine levels increased significantly 26.1 times the following morning; however, urinary metabolites of furan did not increase significantly. Compared to non-smokers, 2 furan metabolites, N-acetyl-S-[1-(5-acetylamino-5-carboxylpentyl)-1H-pyrrol-3-yl]-L-cysteine and N-acetyl-S-[1-(5-amino-5-carboxypentyl)-1H-pyrrol-3-yl]-L-cysteine sulfoxide, were significantly higher in WPT smokers in pre and in post WPT smoking levels. Conclusions: To enable a more rigorous assessment of furan exposure from WPT smoking, future research should determine furan concentrations in WPT smoke, quantify furan metabolites from users of various WPT brands; and extend the investigation to social settings where WPT smoking is habitually practiced.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)202-210
Number of pages9
JournalToxicology Letters
Volume333
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Research reported in this publication was supported by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Center for Tobacco Products (CTP) and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under Award Number R01DA042471 to Nada O.F. Kassem. The furan analyses were supported in part by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences of NIH under Award Number 1U2C ES026533 to Lisa A. Peterson and the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota. The University of Minnesota’s Masonic Cancer Center Analytical Biochemistry and Flow Cytometry Shared Resources are supported in part by NIH P30 CA77598 .

Funding Information:
The furan analyses were supported in part by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences of NIH, United States, under Award Number 1U2C ES026533 to Lisa A. Peterson and the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota.

Keywords

  • Furan
  • Hookah
  • Waterpipe Tobacco

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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