Using 137Cs measurements and sediment yield monitoring to document catchment-scale sediment dynamics and budgets

Jean P.G. Minella, Gustavo H. Merten, Desmond E. Walling, Michele Moro

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The rapid expansion of agriculture in Brazil has increased erosion rates and sediment yields, causing many negative environmental and economic impacts. Given the need to reduce the negative impacts, there is an important need for studies that assess the response of catchment sediment dynamics and budgets to soil and water conservation practices. 137Cs measurements have been combined with measurements of sediment yield, to study the sediment dynamics and budget of a small (1.19 km2) rural catchment in southern Brazil. 137Cs measurements have been used to estimate medium-term erosion and deposition rates along 17 transects in tobacco growing areas. These data have been used to estimate sediment mobilization rates from the cultivated areas subject to significant erosion. By combining the information on sediment mobilization and deposition rates provided by the 137Cs measurements with available measurements of sediment yield, a sediment budget for the catchment has been established.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationErosion and Sediment Yields in the Changing Environment
Pages338-344
Number of pages7
StatePublished - 2012
EventChengdu Symposium on Erosion and Sediment Yields in the Changing Environment - Chengdu, China
Duration: Oct 11 2012Oct 15 2012

Publication series

NameIAHS-AISH Publication
Volume356
ISSN (Print)0144-7815

Other

OtherChengdu Symposium on Erosion and Sediment Yields in the Changing Environment
CountryChina
CityChengdu
Period10/11/1210/15/12

Keywords

  • Brazil
  • Caesium-137
  • Catchment management
  • Sediment yield
  • Soil erosion
  • Tobacco cultivation

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