Variation of the meiotic recombination landscape and properties over a broad evolutionary distance in yeasts

Christian Brion, Sylvain Legrand, Jackson Peter, Claudia Caradec, David Pflieger, Jing Hou, Anne Friedrich, Bertrand Llorente, Joseph Schacherer

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10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Meiotic recombination is a major factor of genome evolution, deeply characterized in only a few model species, notably the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Consequently, little is known about variations of its properties across species. In this respect, we explored the recombination landscape of Lachancea kluyveri, a protoploid yeast species that diverged from the Saccharomyces genus more than 100 million years ago and we found striking differences with S. cerevisiae. These variations include a lower recombination rate, a higher frequency of chromosomes segregating without any crossover and the absence of recombination on the chromosome arm containing the sex locus. In addition, although well conserved within the Saccharomyces clade, the S. cerevisiae recombination hotspots are not conserved over a broader evolutionary distance. Finally and strikingly, we found evidence of frequent reversal of commitment to meiosis, resulting in return to mitotic growth after allele shuffling. Identification of this major but underestimated evolutionary phenomenon illustrates the relevance of exploring non-model species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1006917
JournalPLoS genetics
Volume13
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2017

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding:Thisworkwassupportedbygrantsfrom theAgenceNationaledelaRecherche(ANR):grant 2013-13-BSV6-0012-01toBL,andgrantANR-16-CE12-0019toJS.WealsothanktheUniversityof StrasbourgInstituteforAdvancedStudy(USIAS) fortheirfinancialsupport.JSisamemberofthe InstitutUniversitairedeFrance.Thefundershadno

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 Brion et al.

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