Visit-to-visit blood pressure variability in young adulthood and hippocampal volume and integrity at middle Age The CARDIA study (Coronary artery risk development in Young Adults)

Yuichiro Yano, Jared P. Reis, Deborah A. Levine, R. Nick Bryan, Anthony J. Viera, Daichi Shimbo, Yacob G. Tedla, Norrina B. Allen, Pamela J. Schreiner, Michael P. Bancks, Stephen Sidney, Mark J. Pletcher, Kiang Liu, Philip Greenland, Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, Lenore J. Launer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

The aims of this study are to assess the relationships of visit-to-visit blood pressure (BP) variability in young adulthood to hippocampal volume and integrity at middle age. We used data over 8 examinations spanning 25 years collected in the CARDIA study (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) of black and white adults (age, 18-30 years) started in 1985 to 1986. Visit-to-visit BP variability was defined as by SDBP and average real variability (ARVBP, defined as the absolute differences of BP between successive BP measurements). Hippocampal tissue volume standardized by intracranial volume (%) and integrity assessed by fractional anisotropy were measured by 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging at the year-25 examination (n=545; mean age, 51 years; 54% women and 34% African Americans). Mean systolic BP (SBP)/diastolic BP levels were 110/69 mm Hg at year 0 (baseline), 117/73 mm Hg at year 25, and ARVSBP and SDSBP were 7.7 and 7.9 mm Hg, respectively. In multivariable-adjusted linear models, higher ARVSBP was associated with lower hippocampal volume (unstandardized regression coefficient [standard error] with 1-SD higher ARVSBP: -0.006 [0.003]), and higher SDSBP with lower hippocampal fractional anisotropy (-0.02 [0.01]; all P<0.05), independent of cumulative exposure to SBP during follow-up. Conversely, cumulative exposure to SBP and diastolic BP was not associated with hippocampal volume. There was no interaction by sex or race between ARVSBP or SDSBP with hippocampal volume or integrity. In conclusion, visit-to-visit BP variability during young adulthood may be useful in assessing the potential risk for reductions in hippocampal volume and integrity in midlife.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1091-1098
Number of pages8
JournalHypertension
Volume70
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The CARDIA study (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) is conducted and supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) in collaboration with the University of Alabama at Birmingham (HHSN268201300025C and HHSN268-201300026C), Northwestern University (HHSN268201300027C), University of Minnesota (HHSN268201300028C), Kaiser Foundation Research Institute (HHSN268201300029C), and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (HHSN268200900041C). CARDIA is also partially supported by the Intramural Research Program of the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and an intra-agency agreement between NIA and NHLBI (AG0005). This article has been reviewed by CARDIA for scientific content. Y. Yano is partially supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under award number P20GM104357.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Brain
  • Hippocampus
  • Humans
  • Young adult

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