Walleye recruitment success is less resilient to warming water temperatures in lakes with abundant largemouth bass populations

Gretchen J.A. Hansen, Stephen R. Midway, Tyler Wagner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Lakes respond heterogeneously to climate, with implications for fisheries management. We analyzed walleye (Sander vitreus) recruitment to age-0 in 359 lakes in Wisconsin, USA, to (i) quantify the relationship between annual water temperature degree days (DD) and walleye recruitment success and (ii) identify the influence of lake characteristics - area, conductivity, largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) catch rates, and mean DD - on this relationship. The relationship between walleye recruitment and annual DD varied among lakes and was not distinguishable from zero overall (posterior mean = -0.11, 90% CI = -0.34, 0.15). DD effects on recruitment were negative in 198 lakes (55%) and positive in 161 (45%). The effect of annual DD was most negative in lakes with high largemouth bass densities, and, on average, the probability of recruitment was highest in large lakes with low largemouth bass densities. Conductivity and mean DD influenced neither recruitment nor the effect of annual DD. Walleye recruitment was most resilient to warming in lakes with few largemouth bass, suggesting that the effects of climate change depend on lake-specific food-web and habitat contexts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)106-115
Number of pages10
JournalCanadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Volume75
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We gratefully acknowledge the work of current and former employees of the WDNR and the GLIFWC for collecting and maintaining walleye recruitment and largemouth bass abundance data. We are grateful to the bass–walleye research team for initiating this project and keeping the questions coming: Steve Carpenter, Daisuke Goto, Joe Hennessey, Dan Isermann, Craig Kelling, John Lyons, Eric Pedersen, Andrew Rypel, Greg Sass, Kaitlin Schnell, Tyler Tunney, and Jake Vander Zanden. Thanks also to Jordan Read and Luke Winslow for their leadership in creating the lake temperature model and ensuring that its outputs are available to a variety of users. Thanks to Jennifer Filbert, Alex Latzka, and Mona Papes¸ for collating lake data and to Tom Cichosz, Steve Hewett, and Joe Hennessy for sharing their extensive knowledge of the walleye data set. We are grateful to John Lyons and to two anonymous reviewers for their constructive reviews of earlier versions of this manuscript. This study was funded by the Department of the Interior Northeast Climate Science Center under the proposal “An integrated assessment of lake and stream thermal habitat under climate change”, the United States Geological Survey National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center grant 10909172 to the University of Wisconsin–Madison, and the WDNR Federal Aid in Sport Fish Restoration (Project F-95-P, study SSBW). Any use of trade, firm, or product names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the US Government.

Funding Information:
We gratefully acknowledge the work of current and former employees of the WDNR and the GLIFWC for collecting and maintaining walleye recruitment and largemouth bass abundance data. We are grateful to the bass-walleye research team for initiating this project and keeping the questions coming: Steve Carpenter, Daisuke Goto, Joe Hennessey, Dan Isermann, Craig Kelling, John Lyons, Eric Pedersen, Andrew Rypel, Greg Sass, Kaitlin Schnell, Tyler Tunney, and Jake Vander Zanden. Thanks also to Jordan Read and Luke Winslow for their leadership in creating the lake temperature model and ensuring that its outputs are available to a variety of users. Thanks to Jennifer Filbert, Alex Latzka, and Mona Pape? for collating lake data and to Tom Cichosz, Steve Hewett, and Joe Hennessy for sharing their extensive knowledge of the walleye data set. We are grateful to John Lyons and to two anonymous reviewers for their constructive reviews of earlier versions of this manuscript. This study was funded by the Department of the Interior Northeast Climate Science Center under the proposal ?An integrated assessment of lake and stream thermal habitat under climate change?, the United States Geological Survey National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center grant 10909172 to the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the WDNR Federal Aid in Sport Fish Restoration (Project F-95-P, study SSBW). Any use of trade, firm, or product names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the US Government.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018, Canadian Science Publishing. All rights reserved.

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