Where Students With the Most Significant Cognitive Disabilities Are Taught:Implications for General Curriculum Access

Harold Kleinert, Elizabeth Towles-Reeves, Rachel Quenemoen, Martha Thurlow, Lauren Fluegge, Laura Weseman, Allison Kerbel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

62 Scopus citations

Abstract

Surveying 15 states and 39,837 students, this study examined the extent to which students who took an alternate assessment based on alternate achievement standards in the 2010–2011 school year had access to regular education settings and the extent to which that access correlated with expressive communication, use of an augmentative or alternative communication (AAC) system, and reading and math skill levels. The vast majority (93%) of students were served in self-contained classrooms, separate schools, or home settings, whereas only 7% were served in regular education or resource room placements. There was a significant, positive correlation between expressive communication and reading and math skill levels with increasingly inclusive classroom settings and a significant, negative correlation between use of AAC and more inclusive settings. Implications of these findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)312-328
Number of pages17
JournalExceptional Children
Volume81
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2015

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (H373X100002, Project Officer: Susan.Weigert@ed.gov ). The contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and no assumption of endorsement by the federal government should be made.

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