Why continued surveillance? Intermittent blood pressure and heart rate abnormality under treatment

G. S. Katinas, Germaine G Cornelissen-Guillaume, K. Otsuka, E. Haus, E. E. Bakken, F. Halberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Several opinion leaders have monitored their blood pressure systematically a sufficient number of times a day for chronomic (time structural) analyses, from the time of encountering chronobiology until their death; they set an example for others who also may not wish to base treatment on single spotchecks in a health care office. Such self-measurements, while extremely helpful, were not readily feasible without a noteworthy interruption of activities during waking as well as of sleep. New, relatively unobtrusive instrumentation now makes monitoring possible and cost-effective and will save lives. Illustrative results and problems encountered in an as-one-goes self-survey by GSK, a physician-scientist, are presented herein. Both MESOR-hypertension and CHAT (circadian hyper-amplitude-tension) can be intermittent conditions even under treatment, and treatment is best adjusted based on monitoring, rather than "flying blind".

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S141-S151
JournalBiomedicine and Pharmacotherapy
Volume59
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2005

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Heart rate
  • Surveillance

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