Workplace violence victimization in young workers: An analysis of the US National Crime Victimization Survey, 2008 to 2012

Maisha Toussaint, Marizen R. Ramirez, Corinne Peek-Asa, Audrey Saftlas, Carri Casteel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to measure the frequency of workplace violence (WPV) victimization in 16 to 24-year olds in the United States and compare rates by occupation and demographics. Methods: As an open cohort, participants 12 years or older in the National Crime Victimization Survey were interviewed at 6-month intervals over a 3-year period from 2008 to 2012. WPV victimization rates were calculated. Weighted, multilevel Poisson regression was used to compare WPV victimization rates by occupation and demographics. Results: The rate of WPV victimization was 1.11 incidents per 1000 employed person-months (95% confidence interval: 0.95-1.27). The highest rates of WPV were in protective service occupations (5.24/1000 person-months), transportation (3.04/1000 person-months), and retail sales (2.29/1000 person-months). Compared with their respective counterparts, lower rates of WPV victimization were found among younger, black, and rural/suburban workers. Conclusions: Findings identify occupations and target populations in need of future research and evidence-based interventions to improve the working conditions for young workers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)691-700
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Industrial Medicine
Volume62
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2019

Keywords

  • adolescence
  • industry
  • occupational injury
  • young adult

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Workplace violence victimization in young workers: An analysis of the US National Crime Victimization Survey, 2008 to 2012'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this