Accelerometer-determined physical activity and clinical low back pain measures in adolescents with chronic or subacute recurrent low back pain

Brent Leininger, Craig Schulz, Zan Gao, Gert Bronfort, Roni Evans, Zachary Pope, Nan Zeng, Mitchell Haas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Study Design: Cross-sectional. Background: Although low back pain (LBP) occurs commonly in adolescence, little is known about the relationship between objectively measured physical activity and chronic LBP. OBJECTIVES: To assess the relationship between an objective physical activity measure (accelerometer) and standard clinical measures (pain intensity, disability, and quality of life) in a sample of adolescents with recurrent or chronic LBP. Methods: The study included a subsample of 143 adolescents, 12 to 18 years of age, from a randomized clinical trial. Pearson correlations (r) and bivariate linear regression were used to assess the relationship between baseline measures of sedentary, light, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity using accelerometers and clinical measures of LBP (pain intensity, disability, and quality of life). Results: Participants spent an average of 610.5 minutes in sedentary activity, 97.6 minutes in light physical activity, and 35.6 minutes in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per day. Physical activity was very weakly associated with clinical measures of LBP (r<0.13). None of the assessed correlations were statistically significant, and bivariate regression models showed that physical activity measures explained very little of the variability for clinical measures of LBP (R2<0.02). Conclusion: We found no important relationship between objectively measured physical activity and self-reported LBP intensity, disability, or quality of life in adolescents with recurrent or chronic LBP. The parent randomized clinical trial was registered at ClinicalTrials. gov (NCT01096628).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)769-774
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Volume47
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2017

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
1University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN. 2Children’s Hospitals and Clinics, Minneapolis, MN. 3University of Western States, Portland, OR. *Co-primary authors. The Institutional Review Boards at Northwestern Health Sciences University (Bloomington, MN) and the University of Western States (Portland, OR) approved the protocol for the parent randomized clinical trial. This secondary analysis was approved by the Institutional Review Board at the University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, MN). The parent randomized clinical trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01096628). The trial was funded by the US Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Health Professions, Division of Medicine and Dentistry (grant number R18HP15124). The content and conclusions of this manuscript are those of the authors and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by, the US government, Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Health Professions, or Division of Medicine and Dentistry. In addition, Dr Leininger is supported by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health of the National Institutes of Health under award number K01AT008965. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. The authors certify that they have no affiliations with or financial involvement in any organization or entity with a direct financial interest in the subject matter or materials discussed in the article. Address correspondence to Dr Zan Gao, School of Kinesiology, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, 207 Cooke Hall, 1900 University Ave SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455. E-mail: gaoz@umn.edu U Copyright ©2017 Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy®

Keywords

  • Disability
  • Lumbar spine
  • Quality of life

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