Anthropogenic Methane Emission and Its Partitioning for the Yangtze River Delta Region of China

Cheng Hu, Timothy J Griffis, Shoudong Liu, Wei Xiao, Ning Hu, Wenjing Huang, Dong Yang, Xuhui Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Urban areas are global methane (CH4) hotspots. Yet large uncertainties still remain for the CH4 budget of these domains. The Yangtze River Delta (YRD), China, is one of the world's most densely populated regions where a large number of cities are located. To estimate anthropogenic CH4 emissions in YRD, we conducted simultaneous atmospheric CH4 and CO2 mixing ratio measurements from June 2010 to April 2011. By combining these measurements with the Weather Research and Forecasting and Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport models and a priori Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research emission inventories, we applied three “top-down” approaches to constrain anthropogenic CH4 emissions. These three approaches included multiplicative scaling factors, flux ratio, and scale factor Bayesian inversion. The posteriori CH4 flux density estimated from the three approaches showed high consistency and were 36.32 (±9.17), 35.66 (±2.92), and 36.03(±14.25) nmol·m−2·s−1, respectively, for the duration of the study period (November 2010 to April 2011). The total annual anthropogenic CH4 emission was 6.52(±1.59) Tg for the YRD region based on the average of these three approaches. Our emission estimates were 30.2(±17.6)%, 31.5 (±5.6)%, and 30.8 (±27.4)% lower than the a priori Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research v432 emission inventory estimate. The scale factor Bayesian inversion results indicate that the overestimate was mainly caused by two source categories including fuel exploitation and agricultural soil emissions (rice cultivation). The posteriori flux densities for agricultural soil and fuel exploitation were 10.68 and 6.34 nmol·m−2·s−1, respectively, and were 47.8% and 29.2% lower than the a priori inventory. Agricultural soil was the largest source contribution and accounted for 29.6% of the YRD CH4 budget during the study period.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1148-1170
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences
Volume124
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was partially supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (grants 41505005 and 41475141), the National Science Foundation (grant 1640337), the United States Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA grant num ber 2018‐67019‐27808), the Startup Foundation for Introducing Talent of Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology (grant 2014r046), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (grant BK20150900), the Ministry of Education of China under grant PCSIRT, and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions. CH4, CO2 mixing ratio, and longwave/shortwave radiation data used in this study can be accessed in the supporting information.

Funding Information:
This research was partially supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (grants 41505005 and 41475141), the National Science Foundation (grant 1640337), the United States Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA grant number 2018-67019-27808), the Startup Foundation for Introducing Talent of Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology (grant 2014r046), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (grant BK20150900), the Ministry of Education of China under grant PCSIRT, and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions. CH4, CO2 mixing ratio, and longwave/shortwave radiation data used in this study can be accessed in the supporting information.

Keywords

  • WRF-STILT
  • Yangtze River Delta
  • anthropogenic CH emissions
  • fuel exploitation
  • megacity
  • rice cultivation

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