Assessing structural indicators of child care quality at the local level: Lessons from four Minnesota counties

Deborah A. Ceglowski, Elizabeth E. Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

In 1999 Minnesota was ranked as one of ten states that provide quality child care and education, based primarily on licensing requirements. Yet in response to growing concerns about staff turnover and low quality, a partnership of child care resource and referral staff and university researchers conducted an assessment of the quality of child care in four Minnesota counties. The study provides a framework for assessing child care quality at the local level based on structural indicators using data from multiple sources and methods. The study finds that most child care in Minnesota is not likely to meet the standards for high quality care. Highly qualified teaching staff are difficult to recruit and retain, staff turnover is high and few child care homes and centers are accredited. Additional quality incentives and mandates are needed to insure that the quality of child care fully supports children's developmental and educational success.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-93
Number of pages23
JournalChild and Youth Care Forum
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2004

Keywords

  • Child care
  • Quality care
  • Structural indicators

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