Associations among Distance, Quality, and Safety When Walking from a Park-and-Ride Facility to the Transit Station in the Twin Cities

Jason Cao, Michael Duncan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Planners are interested in moving park-and-ride facilities away from transit stations and leaving space nearby for development. However, the literature offers no indication on how park-and-riders would tolerate longer walking distances. This study applies stated preference surveys to examine park-and-riders’ walking tolerance and other influential factors. We found that park-and-riders overwhelmingly prefer short walking distances but a pedestrian-friendly environment can offset the disutility of walking distances. With safe intersections, good pedestrian infrastructure, and an attractive building appearance, this study indicates that park-and-riders will walk up to two blocks more than they otherwise would. They stated that security, sidewalk, and crosswalk conditions are the most critical.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)496-507
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Planning Education and Research
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4403-9762 Cao Jason 1 2 Duncan Michael 3 1 University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN, USA 2 Beihang University, Beijing, China 3 Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA Jason Cao, Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, 301 19th Ave S, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. Email: cao@umn.edu 12 2019 39 4 496 507 8 2017 8 2018 12 2018 8 2019 9 2019 © The Author(s) 2019 2019 Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning Planners are interested in moving park-and-ride facilities away from transit stations and leaving space nearby for development. However, the literature offers no indication on how park-and-riders would tolerate longer walking distances. This study applies stated preference surveys to examine park-and-riders’ walking tolerance and other influential factors. We found that park-and-riders overwhelmingly prefer short walking distances but a pedestrian-friendly environment can offset the disutility of walking distances. With safe intersections, good pedestrian infrastructure, and an attractive building appearance, this study indicates that park-and-riders will walk up to two blocks more than they otherwise would. They stated that security, sidewalk, and crosswalk conditions are the most critical. walking tolerance stated preference land use economic development transit-oriented development Authors’ Note Chen Zhang helped with the literature review. Joe Lampe helped with the survey design and administration. Ying Jiang helped with the orthogonal factional factorial design. Declaration of Conflicting Interests The author(s) declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article. Funding The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: This study was funded by Minnesota Department of Transportation. ORCID iD Jason Cao https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4403-9762

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2019.

Keywords

  • economic development
  • land use
  • stated preference
  • transit-oriented development
  • walking tolerance

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