Brain, craniofacial, and dental lesions of a free-ranging gray wolf (Canis lupus) implicated in a human attack in minnesota, USA

Marc Schwabenlander, Kevin Stepaniuk, Michelle Carstensen, Aníbal G. Armién

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

We describe significant brain, craniofacial, and dental lesions in a freeranging wolf (Canis lupus) involved in a human attack. On postmortem examination, the wolf presented asymmetric atrophy and bone remodeling affecting the mandible, incisive, maxilla, lacrimal, palatine, frontal, and ethmoid bones. There was an asymmetrical skeletal malocclusion and dental abnormalities including rotated, malpositioned, partially erupted teeth, and an odontogenic cyst asso‐ ciated with an unerupted canine tooth. Brain changes were bilateral loss and atrophy of extensive cortex regions including olfactory bulb, peduncles, and tract, and the frontal lobe. We highlight the relevance of a thorough postmortem examination of wildlife to eluci‐ date disease-based abnormal behavior as the reason for human-animal conflict.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-137
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of wildlife diseases
Volume52
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2016

Keywords

  • Abnormal behavior
  • Brain injury
  • Canis lupus
  • Craniofacial injury
  • Malocclusion
  • Odontogenic cyst
  • Wolf attack

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