Bo Dependence of the On-Resonance Longitudinal Relaxation Time in the Rotating Frame (T) in Protein Phantoms and Rat Brain in Vivo

Heidi I. Mäkelä, Enrico De Vita, Olli H.J. Gröhn, Mikko I. Kettunen, Martin Kavec, Mark Lythgoe, Michael Garwood, Roger Ordidge, Risto A. Kauppinen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

On-resonance longitudinal relaxation time in the rotating frame (T ) has been shown to provide unique information during the early minutes of acute stroke. In the present study, the contributions of the different relaxation mechanisms to on-resonance (T), relaxation were assessed by determining relaxation rates (R) in both protein phantoms and in rat brain at 2.35, 4.7, and 9.4 T. Similar to transverse relaxation rate (R2), R increased substantially with increasing magnetic field strength (Bo). The Bo dependence was more pronounced at weak spin-lock fields. In contrast to R, longitudinal relaxation rate (R1) decreased as a function of increasing Bo field. The present data argue that dipole-dipole interaction forms only one pathway for T , relaxation and the contributions from other physicochemical factors need to be considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4-8
Number of pages5
JournalMagnetic resonance in medicine
Volume51
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2004

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Dipole-dipole interaction
  • Relaxation
  • T

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'B<sub>o</sub> Dependence of the On-Resonance Longitudinal Relaxation Time in the Rotating Frame (T<sub>1ρ</sub>) in Protein Phantoms and Rat Brain in Vivo'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this