Building an all-hazards agricultural emergency response system to maintain business continuity and promote the sustainable supply of food and agricultural products

Marie Culhane, Carol Cardona, Timothy J. Goldsmith, Kaitlyn St Charles, Greg Suskovic, Beth Thompson, Mike Starkey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The response to an agricultural emergency that threatens to destroy crops or animals requires a rapid, coordinated state-level response from the outset. An authority should be established at the local level to initiate and enforce food embargoes, quarantine livestock or poultry premises, depopulate affected or potentially affected animals, and provide indemnity, when appropriate, for those depopulated animals or destroyed products. Depending on the scale of the threat, industry needs, state resources, and response capacity, the authority for these activities currently resides with the state and is supported by federal agencies. However, an all-encompassing all-hazards agricultural emergency response system can be constructed through collaborations with agricultural industry, state responders, and federal agencies. The formed response should include development of permitting guidance for controlled harvest and movement of unaffected crops, animals, and animal products. The ultimate goal is to effectively manage the emergency yet maintain agricultural business continuity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1550907
JournalCogent Food and Agriculture
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This material was made possible, in part, through the University of Minnesota's Secure Food Systems Team Contract with the State of Minnesota Board of Animal Health (BAH) as sponsored project contract number CON000000075615. The views may not necessarily express those of the BAH. Authors Carol Cardona, Marie Culhane, Kaitlyn St. Charles, and Timothy Goldsmith acknowledge funding of their work by Minnesota Board of Animal Health as sponsored project contract number CON000000075615 (Secure Food Systems Team Contract with the State of Minnesota Board of Animal Health). Author Carol Cardona is also funded by the B.S. Pomeroy Chair in Avian Health at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine. Disclaimer: The authors contributed to this article in their personal capacities. The views expressed are their own and do not necessarily represent the views of their funder nor the views of the University of Minnesota, the Minnesota Department of Agriculture, nor the Minnesota Board of Animal Health.

Funding Information:
Authors Carol Cardona, Marie Culhane, Kaitlyn St. Charles, and Timothy Goldsmith acknowledge funding of their work by Minnesota Board of Animal Health as sponsored project contract number CON000000075615 (Secure Food Systems Team Contract with the State of Minnesota Board of Animal Health). Author Carol Cardona is also funded by the B.S. Pomeroy Chair in Avian Health at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 The Author(s). This open access article is distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 4.0 license.

Keywords

  • agriculture
  • emergency preparedness
  • emergency response
  • food security

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