Childhood maltreatment and corpus callosum volume in recently diagnosed patients with bipolar I disorder: Data from the Systematic Treatment Optimization Program for Early Mania (STOP-EM)

J. Bücker, K. Muralidharan, I. J. Torres, W. Su, J. Kozicky, L. E. Silveira, D. J. Bond, W. G. Honer, M. Kauer-Sant'Anna, R. W. Lam, L. N. Yatham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Childhood trauma (CT) has been associated with abnormalities in the corpus callosum (CC). Decreased CC volumes have been reported in children and adolescents with trauma as well as adults with CT compared to healthy controls. CC morphology is potentially susceptible to the effects of Bipolar Disorder (BD) itself. Therefore, we evaluated the relationship between CT and CC morphology in BD. We using magnetic resonance imaging in 53 adults with BD recently recovered from their first manic episode, with (n=23) and without (n=30) CT, defined using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and 16 healthy controls without trauma. ANCOVA was performed with age, gender and intracranial volume as covariates in order to evaluate group differences in CC volume. The total CC volume was found to be smaller in BD patients with trauma compared to BD patients without trauma (p<.05). The differences were more pronounced in the anterior region of the CC. There was a significant negative correlation between CTQ scores and total CC volume in BD patients with trauma (p=.01). We did not find significant differences in the CC volume of patients with/without trauma compared to the healthy subjects. Our sample consists of patients recovered from a first episode of mania and are early in the course of illness and reductions in CC volume may occur late in the course of BD. It might mean there may be two sources of CC volume reduction in these patients: the reduction due to trauma, and the further reduction due to the illness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-72
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Psychiatric Research
Volume48
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Joana Bücker and Leonardo Silveira received a scholarship from Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq), Brazil . Dr. Kauer-Sant'Anna has received research grants from CNPq-INCT-TM, CNPq Universal , CAPES , SMRI , NARSAD , Astra-Zeneca , Eli Lilly and Fipe-HCPA . Dr. Bond is on speaker/advisory boards for, or has received research grants from: the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) , the UBC Institute of Mental Health/Coast Capital Depression Research Fund , the Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) , the Canadian Psychiatric Association , Pfizer, Sunovion, BMS, Otsuka, Astra-Zeneca, and Janssen-Ortho . Dr. Lam is on ad hoc Speaker/Advisory Boards for, or has received research funds from: AstraZeneca , Biovail , Bristol-Myers Squibb , Canadian Institutes of Health Research , Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments , Canadian Psychiatric Association , Eli Lilly, Litebook Company , Lundbeck, Lundbeck Institute, Mochida , Pfizer, Servier, St. Jude's Medical, Takeda , and UBC Institute of Mental Health/Coast Capital Savings . Dr Yatham has received research grants from or is on speaker / advisory boards for AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb , Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments, Eli Lilly & Co., Forest, GlaxoSmithKline, Janssen, Lundbeck, Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research , Novartis, Otsuka, Pfizer, Ranbaxy, Servier, and the Stanley Foundation. Dr. Honer has received consulting fees or sat on paid advisory boards for: MDH Consulting, In Silico, Novartis, Lundbeck and Roche; received honoraria from Rush University , the Korean Society for Schizophrenia Research , the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (Toronto) , the BC Schizophrenia Society , the Fraser, Vancouver Coastal and the Providence Health Authorities , and the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technology in Health ; and received grants from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) . Jan Kozicky, Wayne Su, Dr Torres and Dr Muralidharan Kesavan declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Funding Information:
The data for this study were extracted from the STOP-EM Program which was supported by an unrestricted grant to Dr. Lakshmi N. Yatham from Astrazeneca. The funding sources had no further role in study design; in the collection, analysis and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; and in the decision to submit the paper for publication.

Funding Information:
The data for this study were extracted from the STOP-EM Program which was supported by an unrestricted grant to Dr. Lakshmi N. Yatham from Astrazeneca.

Copyright:
Copyright 2018 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Bipolar disorder
  • Childhood trauma
  • Corpus callosum
  • First episode mania
  • Magnetic resonance imaging

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Childhood maltreatment and corpus callosum volume in recently diagnosed patients with bipolar I disorder: Data from the Systematic Treatment Optimization Program for Early Mania (STOP-EM)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this