Colorectal Cancer Screening in Black Men: Recommendations for Best Practices

Mary R. Kwaan, Rhonda Jones-Webb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Screening for colorectal cancer has been demonstrated to reduce colorectal cancer mortality. Blacks have a higher mortality from this malignancy, particularly men, yet screening rates in this population are often found to be lower than in whites. A modest literature demonstrates effective interventions that can increase screening rates in blacks; however, results are not consistent and ongoing work is required. Most work has not addressed specific barriers to screening in black men. Given the lack of studies on black men only, this study evaluated the state of research in the black population using a PubMed search. The authors provide commentary that proposes increased (1) state and local government support for collaborative programs with healthcare organizations, including patient navigation; (2) augmented community-organizing efforts to generate more attention to the need for colorectal cancer screening in the black community, with a focus on black men; and (3) federal research funding to promote investigation into new interventions and evaluation of existing ones. Specific recommendations for black men include lowering the screening age to 45years, increasing access to health care, the use of patient navigators, and improved reporting and monitoring of colorectal cancer screening rates. Supplement information: This article is part of a supplement entitled African American Men's Health: Research, Practice, and Policy Implications, which is sponsored by the National Institutes of Health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S95-S102
JournalAmerican journal of preventive medicine
Volume55
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This article is part of a supplement entitled African American Men's Health: Research, Practice, and Policy Implications, which is sponsored by the National Institutes of Health.

Funding Information:
Publication of this article was supported by a grant from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, National Institutes of Health [grant number U54MD008620]. The findings and conclusions in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities or the National Institutes of Health.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 Elsevier Ltd

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