Comprehensive phosphoproteome analysis unravels the core signaling network that initiates the earliest synapse pathology in preclinical Alzheimer's disease brain

Kazuhiko Tagawa, Hidenori Homma, Ayumu Saito, Kyota Fujita, Xigui Chen, Seiya Imoto, Tsutomu Oka, Hikaru Ito, Kazumi Motoki, Chisato Yoshida, Hiroyuki Hatsuta, Shigeo Murayama, Takeshi Iwatsubo, Satoru Miyano, Hitoshi Okazawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using a high-end mass spectrometry, we screened phosphoproteins and phosphopeptides in four types of Alzheimer's disease (AD) mousemodels and human AD postmortembrains. We identified commonly changed phosphoproteins in multiple models and also determined phosphoproteins related to initiation of amyloid beta (Aß) deposition in the mouse brain. After confirming these proteins were also changed in andhumanADbrains, we put the proteins on experimentally verified protein-protein interaction databases. Surprisingly, most of the core phosphoproteins were directly connected, and they formed a functional network linked to synaptic spine formation. The change of the core network started at a preclinical stage even before histological Aß deposition. Systems biology analyses suggested that phosphorylation of myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS) by overactivated kinases including protein kinases C and calmodulin-dependent kinases initiates synapse pathology. Two-photon microscopic observation revealed recovery of abnormal spine formation in the AD model mice by targeting a core protein MARCKS or by inhibiting candidate kinases, supporting our hypothesis formulated based on phosphoproteome analysis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberddu475
Pages (from-to)540-558
Number of pages19
JournalHuman molecular genetics
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author 2014.

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Comprehensive phosphoproteome analysis unravels the core signaling network that initiates the earliest synapse pathology in preclinical Alzheimer's disease brain'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this