Deposition of silica agglomerates in a cast of human lung airways: Enhancement relative to spheres of equal mobility and aerodynamic diameter

Jacob H. Scheckman, Peter H. McMurry

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25 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper reports on an experimental study of the deposition of well-characterized silica agglomerates in a cast of a section of a human lung. Deposition of the agglomerates is compared with the deposition of oleic acid spheres and sodium chloride particles for a range of mobility sizes, agglomerate properties (primary particle size and mass-mobility exponent) and inspiratory flow rates. In most cases, agglomerate deposition was significantly greater than that of the oleic acid and sodium chloride particles. Deposition of agglomerates with a more open structure was greater than that of relatively more compact (but still non-spherical) agglomerates. Deposition also increased with the flow rate. Because of the large physical size of the agglomerates, as well as the crenulated flow path through the model and the flow rate dependence, it is likely that interception is responsible for the enhanced deposition of the agglomerates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)508-516
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Aerosol Science
Volume42
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the National Science Foundation , Grant BES-0646507 . Electron microscopy was performed at the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering's Characterization Facility with the assistance of Dr. Lejun Qi and Ranganathan Gopalakrishnan. Dr. Michael Oldham, Community & Environmental Medicine, UC Irvine, generously provided the cast of the human lung section used in this study.

Keywords

  • Agglomerates
  • Fractal
  • Lung deposition
  • Mass
  • Mobility
  • Silica

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