Describing the relationship between occupational and non-occupational physical activity using objective measurement

Meghan M. JaKa, Jacob L. Haapala, Julian Wolfson, Simone A French

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Physical inactivity is a major health risk for working adults, yet the interplay between physical activity levels in work and non-work settings is not well understood. The association between occupational physical activity (OPA) and non-occupational physical activity (non-OPA), and associations by sex, were examined in a group of 233 working adults in the Minneapolis, MN metro area between 2010 and 2012. Methods: Accelerometry-measured activity was split into OPA and non-OPA via participant-reported typical work start and end times. Regression models were used to estimate associations. Results: Average weekly OPA was positively associated with non-OPA (B=0.18, 95% CI: 0.08 to 0.28) and associations were stronger among women than men (Binteraction=-0.39, 95% CI: -0.61 to -0.17). Conclusions: Results suggest that individuals with less physical activity during work also have less physical activity outside of work. Understanding the complexities of the OPA/non-OPA relationship will enable researchers to explore the underlying mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)213-217
Number of pages5
JournalPreventive Medicine Reports
Volume2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The study was funded in part by the NIH , NIDDK , grant numbers R01DK081714 and T32DK083250 .

Keywords

  • Bias (epidemiology)
  • Motor activity
  • Occupational health

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