Distress and professional impairment among psychologists in clinical practice

Michelle D. Sherman, Mark H. Thelen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

75 Scopus citations

Abstract

Distress and professional impairment among psychologists in clinical practice can adversely affect the process of psychotherapy. In this study, 522 practicing psychologists (52.2%) completed a mail survey on distress and impairment. Various life events and work factors were associated with different amounts of distress and impairment, with personal relationship problems and work with difficult clients being particularly troublesome. Respondents who experienced a greater number of life events/ work factors also reported greater distress and impairment. Very high positive correlations emerged between distress and impairment for both life events and work factors. Non-work-related activities and periodic vacations were the most frequently reported preventive behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-85
Number of pages7
JournalProfessional Psychology: Research and Practice
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1998

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