Early Determinants of Postsecondary Education Participation and Degree Attainment: Findings From an Inner-City Minority Cohort

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Abstract

Early determinants of college attendance and degree attainment for economically disadvantaged minority youth were examined in the present study. The study sample (n = 1,379) was drawn from the Chicago Longitudinal Study (CLS), an ongoing investigation of a panel of low-income minority children born in 1980, growing up in high-poverty neighborhoods in Chicago. Regression findings indicated that three factors in elementary grades can potentially improve both college attendance and bachelor's (BA) degree completion for economically disadvantaged minority students: better classroom adjustment, high parent expectation in child's education, and better academic performance. Findings have implications for schools, educators, and policy makers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)474-504
Number of pages31
JournalEducation and Urban Society
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: Preparation of this article was supported by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (R01HD034294).

Copyright:
Copyright 2014 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • college attendance
  • degree attainment
  • minority students
  • postsecondary education

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