Environmental factors modulate biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus

Ying Liu, Jiang Zhang, Yinduo Ji

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Biofilm formation on indwelling medical devices represents an exclusive evasion mechanism for many pathogenic bacteria to establish chronic infections. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major bacterial pathogens that are able to induce both animal and human infections. The continued emergence of multiple drug-resistant S. aureus, especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus, is problematic due to limited treatment options. Biofilm formation by S. aureus complicates the treatment of methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections. Therefore, elucidating the mechanisms of biofilm formation in this pathogen is important for the development of alternative therapeutic strategies. Various environmental and genetic factors contribute to biofilm formation. In this review, we address the environmental factors and discuss how they affect biofilm formation by S. aureus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalScience Progress
Volume103
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Staphylococcus aureus Liu Ying 1 2 Zhang Jiang 1 https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0199-0195 Ji Yinduo 2 1 Shanghai Vocational College of Agriculture and Forestry, Shanghai, China 2 Department of Veterinary Biomedical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN, USA Yinduo Ji, Department of Veterinary Biomedical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, 1971 Commonwealth Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55108, USA. Email: jixxx002@umn.edu 12 2020 0036850419898659 © The Author(s) 2020 2020 SAGE Publications This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License ( https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages ( https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage ). Biofilm formation on indwelling medical devices represents an exclusive evasion mechanism for many pathogenic bacteria to establish chronic infections. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major bacterial pathogens that are able to induce both animal and human infections. The continued emergence of multiple drug-resistant S. aureus , especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus , is problematic due to limited treatment options. Biofilm formation by S. aureus complicates the treatment of methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections. Therefore, elucidating the mechanisms of biofilm formation in this pathogen is important for the development of alternative therapeutic strategies. Various environmental and genetic factors contribute to biofilm formation. In this review, we address the environmental factors and discuss how they affect biofilm formation by S. aureus . Staphylococcus aureus MRSA biofilm antibiotics environmental conditions edited-state corrected-proof typesetter ts1 The authors thank Ms. Michelle Ji and Nansea Ji for their careful editing of the manuscript and for providing constructive suggestions. Declaration of conflicting interests The author(s) declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article. Funding The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: This work was partially supported by award MIN-63-113 from the General Agricultural Research fund for the EZD Signature Program Funding in the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Minnesota. ORCID iD Yinduo Ji https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0199-0195

Keywords

  • MRSA
  • Staphylococcus aureus
  • antibiotics
  • biofilm
  • environmental conditions

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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