Factors associated with BMI, weight perceptions and trying to lose weight in African-American smokers

Rebecca E. Lee, Kari Jo Harris, Delwyn Catley, Valerie Shostrom, Simon Choi, Matthew S. Mayo, Kola Okuyemi, Harsohena Kaur, Jasjit S. Ahluwalia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined sociodemographic, behavioral and psychosocial factors associated with BMI, weight perceptions and trying to lose weight among African-American smokers (N=600, M=44.2 years, 70% female). Sixty-eight percent of the sample were overweight or obese (sample BMI M=28.0, SD=6.7). Three separate, simultaneous multivariable regression models were used to determine which factors were associated with BMI, weight perceptions and trying to lose weight. Poorer health, female gender and high-school education or higher were significantly associated with higher BMIs (p<0.05). Being female (OR=5.8, 95% CI=3.6-9.3) and having a higher BMI (OR=0.6, 95% CI=0.5-0.6) was associated with perception of overweight and smoking more cigarettes per day (OR=1.0, 95% CI=1.0-1.1), and perceiving oneself as overweight (OR=14.1, 95% CI=8.2-24.2) was associated with trying to lose weight. Participants somewhat underestimated their BMI in their weight perceptions. Those who perceived themselves as overweight were more likely to be trying to lose weight; therefore, increasing participant awareness of actual BMI status may lead to improved weight-control efforts in African-American smokers. Several expected associations with outcomes were not found, suggesting that BMI and weight constructs are not well-understood in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-61
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume97
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Keywords

  • Minority groups
  • Obesity
  • Smoking cessation
  • Weight loss
  • Weight perception

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Factors associated with BMI, weight perceptions and trying to lose weight in African-American smokers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this