Gastric transposition for esophageal replacement in children: Experience with 41 consecutive cases with special emphasis on esophageal atresia

Ronald B. Hirschl, Dani Yardeni, Keith Oldham, Neil Sherman, Leo Siplovich, Eitan Gross, Raphael Udassin, Zehavi Cohen, Hagith Nagar, James D. Geiger, Arnold G. Coran, Moritz M. Ziegler, John E. Foker, Tom R. DeMeester

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

82 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the authors' experience with gastric transposition as a method of esophageal replacement in children with congenital or acquired abnormalities of the esophagus. Summary Background Data: Esophageal replacement in children is almost always done for benign disease and thus requires a conduit that will last more than 70 years. The organ most commonly used in the past has been colon; however, most series have been fraught with major complications and conduit loss. For these reasons, in 1985 the authors switched from using colon interpositions to gastric transpositions for esophageal replacement in infants and children. Methods: The authors retrospectively reviewed the records of 41 patients with the diagnoses of esophageal atresia (n = 26), corrosive injury (n = 8), leiomyomatosis (n = 5), and refractory gastroesophageal reflux (n = 2) who underwent gastric transposition for esophageal replacement. Results: Mean ± SE age at the time of gastric transposition was 3.3 ± 0.6 years. All but two transpositions were performed through the posterior mediastinum without mortality or loss of the gastric conduit despite previous surgery on the gastric fundus in 8 (20%), previous esophageal operations in 15 (37%), and previous esophageal perforations in 6 (15%) patients. Complications included esophagogastric anastomotic leak (n = 15, 36%), which uniformly resolved without intervention; stricture formation (n = 20, 49%), all of which no longer require dilation; and feeding intolerance necessitating jejunal feeding (n = 8, 20%) due to delayed gastric emptying (n = 3), feeding aversion related to the underlying anomaly (n = 1), or severe neurological impairment (n = 4). No redo anastomoses were required. Conclusions: Gastric transposition reestablishes effective gastrointestinal continuity with few complications. Oral feeding and appropriate weight gain are achieved in most children. Therefore, gastric transposition is an appropriate alternative for esophageal replacement in infants and children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)531-541
Number of pages11
JournalAnnals of surgery
Volume236
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2002

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