Genetic counseling following the detection of hemoglobinopathy trait on the newborn screen is well received, improves knowledge, and relieves anxiety

Beth Kladny, Andrea Williams, Ashish Gupta, Elizabeth A. Gettig, Lakshmanan Krishnamurti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: The primary purpose of newborn screening for hemoglobinopathies is the presymptomatic diagnosis and early treatment of sickle cell disease. Hemoglobinopathy traits detected on the newborn screening provide an opportunity for genetic counseling of families regarding the trait and information that may impact reproductive decisions of the parents. We describe the results of a study to determine the impact of newborn screening and genetic counseling on the lives of families in which an abnormal hemoglobin trait had been identified. Methods: From June 2003 to December 2009, families of children with trait attending a clinic visit and receiving professional genetic counseling were asked to participate in a semistructured follow-up survey regarding their experience and the impact of genetic counseling on their families. Results: Of the 300 patients seen in clinic during the specified time period, 209 consented to be recontacted and 114 have completed the survey. Eighty-five percent of responders reported knowing that the newborn screen had been performed, but only 55% understood the purpose of newborn screening. When asked about the effect of finding out that trait was present in their baby, 19% reported feeling guilty or upset, whereas 4% believed that their partner blamed them for the child's results. That genetic counseling was found to be beneficial was indicated by the fact that 99% reported that their questions were answered, 82% reported feeling less anxious, and 78% discussed the trait with their partner after the appointment. Conclusions: Genetic counseling after newborn screening relieves anxiety, provides knowledge, facilitates dialog within families and between partners about hemoglobinopathy trait, and was seen as a positive experience for the majority of responders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)658-661
Number of pages4
JournalGenetics in Medicine
Volume13
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • abnormal hemoglobin follow-up
  • newborn screening
  • sickle cell disease
  • sickle cell trait

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Genetic counseling following the detection of hemoglobinopathy trait on the newborn screen is well received, improves knowledge, and relieves anxiety'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this