Influence of modified protein diets on electrolyte, acid base, and divalent ion balance in dogs with experimentally induced chronic renal failure.

David J Polzin, C. A. Osborne, J. B. Stevens, D. W. Hayden

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10 Scopus citations

Abstract

The influence of a maintenance diet (44.4% dry weight protein) and 2 reduced protein diets (8.2 and 17.2% dry weight protein) on acid-base, electrolyte, and divalent ion balance of dogs with experimentally induced chronic renal failure was studied for 40 weeks. Moderate-to-severe hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis developed in dogs fed the 8.2% protein diet, but not in the groups fed the 17.2% and 44.4% protein diets. Serum sodium and potassium concentrations were not altered significantly by the diets. Mean serum calcium concentrations increased significantly in the 3 groups after renal failure was induced; however, serum calcium concentration generally did not exceed the normal range. Dogs fed reduced protein diets had smaller serum magnesium and phosphorus concentrations than did the dogs fed the maintenance diet. Microscopic alterations in bone morphology consistent with canine renal osteodystrophy were not detected after 40 weeks of renal failure in dogs fed the 17.2% and 44.4% protein diets. Examination of skull radiographs of the dogs prepared 40 weeks after renal failure was induced revealed that the lamina dura dentes were visible in all groups. It was concluded that the 8.2% protein diet was of therapeutic benefit in management of altered divalent ion metabolism in dogs with chronic renal failure. However, the high frequency of concomitant acidosis indicated that appropriate alkalinization therapy should be included with this diet. Adverse effects of feeding the 17.2% protein diet were not detected. However, it was less effective than the 8.2% protein diet in minimizing development of hypermagnesemia and skeletal changes consistent with renal osteodystrophy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1978-1986
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume43
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1 1982

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