Language experience differentiates prefrontal and subcortical activation of the cognitive control network in novel word learning

Kailyn A.L. Bradley, Kelly E. King, Arturo E. Hernandez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the cognitive control mechanisms in adult English speaking monolinguals compared to early sequential Spanish-English bilinguals during the initial stages of novel word learning. Functional magnetic resonance imaging during a lexico-semantic task after only 2. h of exposure to novel German vocabulary flashcards showed that monolinguals activated a broader set of cortical control regions associated with higher-level cognitive processes, including the supplementary motor area (SMA), anterior cingulate (ACC), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), as well as the caudate, implicated in cognitive control of language. However, bilinguals recruited a more localized subcortical network that included the putamen, associated more with motor control of language. These results suggest that experience managing multiple languages may differentiate the learning strategy and subsequent neural mechanisms of cognitive control used by bilinguals compared to monolinguals in the early stages of novel word learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)101-110
Number of pages10
JournalNeuroImage
Volume67
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 5 2013

Keywords

  • Bilingualism
  • Cognitive control
  • FMRI
  • Word learning

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