Latino adolescent-father discrepancies in reporting activity parenting practices and associations with adolescents' physical activity and screen time

Youjie Zhang, Aysegul Baltaci, Francine Overcash, Stephanie Druziako, Alejandro Peralta, Ghaffar Ali Hurtado, Marla Reicks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Latino fathers may play important roles in adolescents' physical activity and screen time. However, informant discrepancies regarding paternal activity parenting practices may challenge studies supporting evidence-based applications. This study examined Latino adolescent-father discrepancies in reporting paternal activity parenting practices, types of discrepancies by participant characteristics, and associations between discrepancy types and adolescents' physical activity and screen time. Methods: The sample for this cross-sectional study included Latino early adolescents and their fathers (n = 138 dyads) from baseline data collected for a family-centered, healthy lifestyle intervention in a metropolitan area. In parallel measures, Latino adolescents and fathers reported paternal activity parenting practices related to expectation or allowance, behavioral modeling, and providing opportunities for physical activity or screen time. Level of agreement and discrepancies were examined using the percentage of agreement, weighted kappa statistics, Pearson correlation coefficients, and paired-sample t-tests. Undesirable discrepancy types included adolescents reporting lower scores for paternal physical activity parenting practices or higher scores for paternal screen time parenting practices than fathers. Participants' sociodemographic characteristics and weight status were compared by discrepancy type using between-group t-tests or Chi-square tests. Associations between discrepancy type and adolescents' physical activity and screen time were examined using multivariate regression analyses. Results: The study sample was low-income with a high prevalence of overweight and obesity. Adolescent and paternal reports of activity parenting practices had poor agreement (percentages of agreement: 22.2-34.3%, weighted kappa statistics: < 0.2, and correlation coefficients: 0.06-0.25). An undesirable discrepancy type for certain parenting practices was more likely to be observed among fathers without full-time employment, girls, older adolescents, and adolescents and fathers within overweight or obese BMI categories. Discrepancies in paternal expectation regarding physical activity and allowance of screen time had adverse associations with adolescents' physical activity (β =-0.18, p = 0.008) and screen time (β = 0.51, p < 0.001). Conclusion and implications: Discrepancies in reporting activity parenting practices were evident between Latino adolescents and their fathers, especially among certain sociodemographic and weight status groups. Adolescents' perceptions on paternal parenting practices tended to be better indicators of their activity levels than fathers' reports.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number92
JournalBMC public health
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 21 2020

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Latino adolescent-father discrepancies in reporting activity parenting practices and associations with adolescents' physical activity and screen time'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this