Narrow-band search for gravitational waves from known pulsars using the second LIGO observing run

LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration

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18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Isolated spinning neutron stars, asymmetric with respect to their rotation axis, are expected to be sources of continuous gravitational waves. The most sensitive searches for these sources are based on accurate matched filtering techniques that assume the continuous wave to be phase locked with the pulsar beamed emission. While matched filtering maximizes the search sensitivity, a significant signal-to-noise ratio loss will happen in the case of a mismatch between the assumed and the true signal phase evolution. Narrow-band algorithms allow for a small mismatch in the frequency and spin-down values of the pulsar while coherently integrating the entire dataset. In this paper, we describe a narrow-band search using LIGO O2 data for the continuous wave emission of 33 pulsars. No evidence of a continuous wave signal is found, and upper limits on the gravitational wave amplitude over the analyzed frequency and spin-down ranges are computed for each of the targets. In this search, we surpass the spin-down limit, namely, the maximum rotational energy loss due to gravitational waves emission for some of the pulsars already present in the LIGO O1 narrow-band search, such as J1400-6325, J1813-1246, J1833-1034, J1952+3252, and for new targets such as J0940-5428 and J1747-2809. For J1400-6325, J1833-1034, and J1747-2809, this is the first time the spin-down limit is surpassed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number122002
JournalPhysical Review D
Volume99
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 27 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the United States National Science Foundation (NSF) for the construction and operation of the LIGO Laboratory and Advanced LIGO as well as the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) of the United Kingdom, the Max-Planck-Society (MPS), and the State of Niedersachsen/Germany for support of the construction of Advanced LIGO and construction and operation of the GEO600 detector. Additional support for Advanced LIGO was provided by the Australian Research Council. The authors gratefully acknowledge the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), and the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter supported by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research for the construction and operation of the Virgo detector and the creation and support of the European Gravitational Observatory consortium. The authors also gratefully acknowledge research support from these agencies as well as by the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research of India, the Department of Science and Technology, India, the Science & Engineering Research Board, India, the Ministry of Human Resource Development, India, the Spanish Agencia Estatal de Investigación, the Vicepresidència i Conselleria d’Innovació, Recerca i Turisme and the Conselleria d’Educació i Universitat del Govern de les Illes Balears, the Conselleria d’Educació, Investigació, Cultura i Esport de la Generalitat Valenciana, the National Science Centre of Poland, the Swiss National Science Foundation, the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, the Russian Science Foundation, the European Commission, the European Regional Development Funds, the Royal Society, the Scottish Funding Council, the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund, the Lyon Institute of Origins, the National Research, Development and Innovation Office Hungary, the National Research Foundation of Korea, Industry Canada and the Province of Ontario through the Ministry of Economic Development and Innovation, the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council Canada, the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, the Brazilian Ministry of Science, Technology, Innovations, and Communications, the International Center for Theoretical Physics South American Institute for Fundamental Research, the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong, the National Natural Science Foundation of China, the Leverhulme Trust, the Research Corporation, the Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan, and the Kavli Foundation. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the NSF, STFC, MPS, INFN, CNRS, and the State of Niedersachsen/Germany for provision of computational resources. Work at Naval Research Laboratory is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The authors acknowledge the anonymous referees for helping improve this paper. This work has been assigned LIGO Document No. LIGO-P1800391.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 us. American Physical Society. American Physical Society.

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