Ocular injury presenting to a level-III pediatric trauma center

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Abstract

Objective The purpose of this study is to describe pediatric ocular injuries presenting to a level-III pediatric trauma center and emergency department. Methods We performed a retrospective study and identified children from January 1, 2011, to January 1, 2016. Charts were reviewed for any subject, age from newborn to younger than 18 years, based on International Classification of Diseases, ninth and tenth revision, codes for any ocular injury. Data abstraction included age, sex, means of arrival, eye involved, mechanism of injury, type of ocular injury, imaging studies obtained, procedures performed, location of definitive repair (in the operating room or emergency department), and subspecialty services involved. Results In the 5-year period, we describe 356 injuries among 278 children. Males had a slightly higher rate of presentation than females (156 and 122, respectively). Forty-three children (15.46%) required repair in the operating room. Dog bites comprised of 7.19% children with outpatient follow-up, one patient (0.36%) eventually developed anophthalmia, and 30 children (10.79%) had long-term ophthalmological sequelae (ie, glaucoma and blindness). Conclusions At our institution, a level-III trauma center, we evaluated and managed approximately 1 ocular injury case per week and children required surgical repair in the operating room at a higher rate than higher-level trauma centers. Injuries secondary to dog bites remain a clinically significant etiology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e606-e609
JournalPediatric Emergency Care
Volume36
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2020
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
From the *Department of Pediatrics, Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Minnesota Masonic Children's Hospital; †University of Minnesota School of Medicine; ‡Department of Surgery, Pediatric Surgery, University of Minnesota Masonic Children’s Hospital; and §Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Neurosciences, Lions Children's Eye Clinic, University of Minnesota Masonic Children's Hospital, Minneapolis, MN. Disclosure: The authors declare no conflict of interest. Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health (UL1TR000114). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. Reprints: Jeffrey P. Louie, MD, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Minnesota Masonic Children's Hospital, 2450 Riverside Ave, Minneapolis, MN 55454 (e‐mail: Louie003@umn.edu). Copyright © 2018 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved. ISSN: 0749-5161

Keywords

  • dog bite
  • hyphema
  • level-III trauma center
  • ocular injury

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