Perceived threat, immigration policy support, and media coverage: Hostile media and presumed influence

Brendan R. Watson, Daniel Riffe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study, using survey data (N = 529), examined perceived immigration "threat," subjective knowledge, support for punitive and assimilative immigration policies, and opinions about media coverage effects. Perceived threat was not related to a third-person effect; however, perceived threat of immigrants was related to support for punitive immigration policies, and a strong "hostile media perception" was confirmed. There was a significant belief among respondents that others would view immigration negatively, if only media were not biased in favor of immigration. Internet use, age, race, and education predicted threat perception; perceived threat, perceived favorableness of coverage, and daily newspaper reading predicted presumed influence of news coverage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-479
Number of pages21
JournalInternational Journal of Public Opinion Research
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013

Bibliographical note

Copyright:
Copyright 2013 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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