Perceptions of Utah alfalfa growers about wildlife damage to their hay crops: Implications for managing wildlife on private land

Terry A. Messmer, Sue Schroeder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

We conduct a survey of Utah alfalfa (Medicago sativa) growers in 1993 to identify wildlife damage problems to hay crops. Such surveys can provide wildlife managers with important insights regarding landowners wildlife damage management concerns and needs. Pocket gophers (Thomonys spp.) and mule deer (Odecoileus hemionus) were perceived by growers as causing the most damage. Respondents reported a total annual loss of $350,000 or $24.79/ha (2.8% of the total crop value) because of wildlife damage in alfalfa crops. Decreased hay quantity was the most frequently cited problem caused by wildlife. Compensation and incentive programs were preferred over assistance and information programs for managing wildlife damage in alfalfa crops.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)254-260
Number of pages7
JournalGreat Basin Naturalist
Volume56
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jul 1 1996

Keywords

  • alfalfa growers
  • wildlife damage management
  • wildlife damage perceptions
  • wildlife management

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