Polymer and particle dynamics and assembly in varied hydrodynamic fields

Eric D. Ruud, Nikolas A. Wilkinson, Cari S. Dutcher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Polymeric solutions and colloidal suspensions are complex fluidic mixtures featuring mesoscopic characteristic length scales. An exciting feature of complex fluids is their unusual response to external stimulus, such as mechanical, electrical, or chemical forcing, due to changes in the orientation, structure, and assembly of the dissolved or suspended macromolecules. These tunable polymer and particle dynamics and interactions play essential roles in both industrial and environmental aqueous processes. In this work, recent advancements in complex fluid dynamics and macromolecular assembly in varied hydrodynamic fields are highlighted, including viscoelastic (de)stabilization in Taylor-Couette flow, colloidal particle assembly in electrohydrodynamic flows, and polyelectrolyte-particle flocculation in turbulent flows. Polymers including neutral polyethylene oxide and charged cationic polyacrylamide and particles including charged spherical beads and smectite inorganic clays are explored here. Polymer-particle dynamics and assembly, if well understood, can be engineered for key contributions in environmental remediation and energy-saving applications. Polymer and particle dynamics and assembly play essential roles in both industrial and environmental aqueous processes. In this work, recent advancements in complex fluid dynamics and macromolecular assembly in varied hydrodynamic fields are highlighted, including viscoelastic (de)stabilization in Taylor-Couette flow, colloidal particle assembly in electrohydrodynamic flows, and polyelectrolyte-particle flocculation in turbulent flows.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)390-402
Number of pages13
JournalMacromolecular Chemistry and Physics
Volume217
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors are pleased to acknowledge the work of graduate student Hallie Boyer for the steady-shear viscosity characterization of the polyelectrolyte solutions and undergraduate student Christian Ruud for a portion of the fl oc microstructure characterization. C.S.D. gratefully acknowledges Prof. Susan Muller and Prof. William Ristenpart, who oversaw her graduate and postdoctoral studies in Taylor?Couette and electrohydrodynamic fl ows, respectively, as well as all former and current collaborators whose names appear in the references, especially including Dr. Taylor Woehl. Part of this work was carried out in the College of Science and Engineering Characterization Facility, University of Minnesota, which received capital equipment funding from the NSF through the UMN MRSEC program under Award Number DMR- 1420013. This work was supported primarily by the National Science Foundation through the University of Minnesota MRSEC under Award Number DMR-1420013. This research was conducted with Government support under and awarded by Department of Defense, Air Force Offi ce of Scientifi c Research, National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship, 32 CFR 168a. C.S.D. received support from the 3M Non-Tenured Faculty Award.

Keywords

  • clay
  • colloids
  • polyelectrolytes
  • rheology
  • self-assembly

How much support was provided by MRSEC?

  • Primary

Reporting period for MRSEC

  • Period 2

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