Promoting Global Citizenship Through Study Abroad: The Influence of Program Destination, Type, and Duration on the Propensity for Development Volunteerism

Aaron S. Horn, Gerald W. Fry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Study abroad is cited commonly as a critical element of education for global civic engagement, but the significance of various programmatic features has not been well established. This study examines the relationships among three facets of study abroad programs-destination, type, and duration-and subsequent volunteerism through international development organizations. Survey responses were analyzed from 2,250 college alumni (71 % female, 14 % ethnic minority, M age = 27) who studied abroad between 1995 and 2005. The results of logistic regression indicated that studying abroad in a developing country and engaging in international service-learning were positively associated with the odds of development volunteerism. The number of months spent abroad also predicted development volunteerism, though duration did not moderate the effects of program destination and type. An interaction test demonstrated that program effects were not dependent on gender. The findings suggest that differences in the nature of study abroad programs influence the extent to which participants become actively engaged in global civil society.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1159-1179
Number of pages21
JournalVoluntas
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013

Keywords

  • Civic engagement
  • International education
  • Study abroad
  • Volunteerism

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