Racial residential segregation, racial discrimination, and diabetes: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study

Stephanie L. Mayne, Luigi Loizzo, Michael P. Bancks, Mercedes R. Carnethon, Sharrelle Barber, Penny Gordon-Larsen, April P. Carson, Pamela J. Schreiner, Anne E. Bantle, Kara M. Whitaker, Kiarri N. Kershaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Although racial residential segregation and interpersonal racial discrimination are associated with cardiovascular disease, few studies have examined their link with diabetes risk or management. We used longitudinal data from 2,175 black participants in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study to examine associations of racial residential segregation (Gi* statistic) and experiences of racial discrimination with diabetes incidence and management. Multivariable Cox models estimated associations for incident diabetes and GEE logistic regression estimated associations with diabetes management (meeting targets for HbA1c, systolic blood pressure, and LDL cholesterol). Neither segregation nor discrimination were associated with diabetes incidence or management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number102286
JournalHealth and Place
Volume62
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study is supported by contracts HHSN268201300025C , HHSN268201300026C , HHSN268201300027C , HHSN268201300028C , HHSN268201300029C , and HHSN268200900041C from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) ; the Intramural Research Program of the National Institute on Aging (NIA) ; and intra-agency agreement AG0005 between the NIA and NHLBI . The neighborhood measures used in this research were developed with grants R01HL104580 and R01HL114091 from the NHLBI . SLM and MPB were supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number T32HL069771 to conduct the current work. NIH had no role in the design or conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, or interpretation of the data; or preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript. This manuscript has been reviewed by CARDIA for scientific content. Data are available from the CARDIA Study, whose authors and paper proposal forms may be contacted at: http://www.cardia.dopm.uab.edu/ . The contact person for paper proposals is Linda Sellers: lsellers@uabmc.edu . This dataset is not able to be provided as the data are controlled by the CARDIA investigators to ensure that there are no overlapping CARDIA paper and presentation publications. Any author who wishes to obtain the data may do so after having a manuscript proposal approved by the CARDIA steering committee.

Funding Information:
The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study is supported by contracts HHSN268201300025C, HHSN268201300026C, HHSN268201300027C, HHSN268201300028C, HHSN268201300029C, and HHSN268200900041C from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI); the Intramural Research Program of the National Institute on Aging (NIA); and intra-agency agreement AG0005 between the NIA and NHLBI. The neighborhood measures used in this research were developed with grants R01HL104580 and R01HL114091 from the NHLBI. SLM and MPB were supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number T32HL069771 to conduct the current work. NIH had no role in the design or conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, or interpretation of the data; or preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript. This manuscript has been reviewed by CARDIA for scientific content. Data are available from the CARDIA Study, whose authors and paper proposal forms may be contacted at: http://www.cardia.dopm.uab.edu/. The contact person for paper proposals is Linda Sellers: lsellers@uabmc.edu. This dataset is not able to be provided as the data are controlled by the CARDIA investigators to ensure that there are no overlapping CARDIA paper and presentation publications. Any author who wishes to obtain the data may do so after having a manuscript proposal approved by the CARDIA steering committee.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Epidemiology
  • Neighborhood
  • Racial discrimination
  • Segregation

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