Reducing the burden of severe neonatal jaundice in G6PD-deficient populations in low-income countries: are we doing enough?

Bolajoko O. Olusanya, Tina M. Slusher

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Severe neonatal jaundice (NNJ) remains an important cause of hospitalisation in the first week of life particularly in developing countries where glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is prevalent. NNJ is seldom associated with mortality when closely monitored but portends significant long-term risks in settings where hospitals are ill-equipped to provide phototherapy or exchange blood transfusion. Early detection in high-risk populations is an important first step towards redressing the current lack of global initiatives on NNJ. Investment in the development of low-cost bilirubin monitoring devices, functional phototherapy units at first-level health facilities and improved care-seeking practices are also essential, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-24
Number of pages3
JournalInternational health
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

Keywords

  • Africa
  • G6PD
  • Global disease burden
  • Hyperbilirubinaemia
  • Neonatal jaundice
  • Perinatal morbidity

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