Reliability of self-reported contraceptive use and sexual behaviors among adolescent girls

R. Sieving, W. Hellerstedt, C. McNeely, R. Fee, J. Snyder, M. Resnick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examines two issues relevant to adolescents' self-reported sexual and contraceptive use behaviors: reliability of partner-reverent reports versus 3- and 6-month reports, and test-retest reliability of reports completed over a 2-week period. Data are from 196 13- to 18-year-old girls recruited into this study while they sought reproductive care from health clinics in a metropolitan area. All participants reported having had sexual intercourse during the past 6 months. Twice over a 2-week interval, participants completed the same paper-and-pencil surveys. The survey presented questions about sexual behavior and contraceptive use using 3 sequential frames of reference: within the past 6 months, within the past 3 months, and by specific sexual partners in the past 6 months. Findings demonstrate that adolescent girls can reliably report sexual behavior and contraceptive use over a 6-month interval. Study findings have implications for future research utilizing adolescents' self-reported sexual and contraceptive use behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)159-166
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Sex Research
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2005

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was supported by grant #U48/CCU513331, the National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Research Center, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Copyright:
Copyright 2017 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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