Small intestinal submucosa does not promote PAIII tumor growth in Lobund-Wistar rats

Jason P. Hodde, Mark A. Suckow, William R. Wolter, Michael C. Hiles

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11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Site-specific remodeling and angiogenesis are two observations associated with the use of small intestinal submucosa (SIS) as a tissue repair graft. Its angiogenic capacity has raised questions concerning its effect on tumor growth and metastasis in clinical tumor resection cases. The effect of SIS on the ability of neoplastic (prostate adenocarcinoma) cells to establish, grow, and metastasize was examined in Lobund-Wistar (L-W) rats. Materials and methods In one study, SIS, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE), or human cadaveric dermis was placed in a subcutaneous pocket on the flank of L-W rats and immediately inoculated with PA-III cell suspension. Tumors were allowed to establish and metastasize for 5 weeks prior to sacrifice. Rate of tumor growth, tumor weight, and frequency of lung metastases were assessed. In a second study, SIS was placed in a resected tumor bed and tumors were allowed to recur. Rate of tumor growth, tumor weight, and frequency of lung metastases were assessed after 3 weeks. Results ePTFE hastened the rate of formation of palpable tumors compared to controls and other materials; cadaveric dermis and SIS did not. No differences between materials were noted in final tumor weight nor in the frequency of metastasis to the lungs. Following surgical tumor resection, residual tumor cells led to recurrence of same-site tumors in all animals, but in the defects augmented with SIS, the tumors were significantly smaller than those which regrew in the resected, unaugmented group. Conclusions This study demonstrates that SIS does not enhance tumor establishment, growth, or metastasis in de novo tumors. Furthermore, SIS appears to reduce the rate of tumor growth, but not metastasis, when applied in direct contact with a residual tumor bed in a rat model of prostate-related tumors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)189-194
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume120
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2004

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was supported by a grant from Cook Biotech Inc., the manufacturer of Surgisis. Two of the authors (J.P.H. and M.C.H.) are employed by Cook Biotech Incorporated.

Funding Information:
This study was supported, in part, by a grant from Cook Biotech Inc.

Copyright:
Copyright 2008 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • angiogenesis
  • biomaterial
  • graft
  • metastasis
  • prostate cancer

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