The synergistic interplay of philosophy, place, program, and policy: Learning the art of the possible from small-house nursing homes

Rosalie A Kane, Lois J. Cutler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Developing and sustaining group residential settings that support autonomy and better quality of life (QOL) for older people with substantial disability and functional impairment is a persistent challenge. Fueled since 1995 by the Pioneer Network in Long-Term Care (Koren 2010), the culture change movement for nursing homes (NHs) has made strides in promoting individualized person-centered services in NHs and empowerment of both residents and direct-care unlicensed staff. But some critics lament the enthusiastic embrace of its vaguer tenets (Rahman and Schnelle 2008) and some question the evidence base for culture-change activities (Shier et al. 2014). Meanwhile, institutional living erodes residents' QOL and their sense of identity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationLater-Life Social Support and Service Provision in Diverse and Vulnerable Populations
Subtitle of host publicationUnderstanding Networks of Care
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages173-207
Number of pages35
ISBN (Electronic)9781351839440
ISBN (Print)9780415788304
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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