The third-person effect and its influence on behavioral outcomes in a product advertising context: The case of direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising

Jisu Huh, Denise E. Delorme, Leonard N. Reid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

71 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study explored the third-person effect in the context of direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising. A survey of 264 adults examined perceptions of DTC ad effects and their relationship to support for DTC ad regulation. Results support the third-person-effect perceptual component. The study revealed that for DTC advertising, the third-person effect operates in a multidimensional fashion through four factors (Negative DTC Ad Effects, Learning and Involvement, Patient / Provider Interaction, and Distrust of DTC Ad Information) and that negative content-based third-person effects were greater than positive effects. However, the current study showed weak support for the third-person effect behavioral component. Only perceived self-effect for Distrust of DTC Ad Information and attitude toward DTC advertising were significant predictors of regulatory support. The findings are discussed in relation to existing theoretical work, and future research recommendations are provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)568-599
Number of pages32
JournalCommunication Research
Volume31
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2004

Keywords

  • DTC advertising regulation
  • DTC prescription drug advertising
  • Third-person effect

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