Why is kernicterus still a major cause of death and disability in low-income and middle-income countries?

Bolajoko O. Olusanya, Tinuade A. Ogunlesi, Tina M. Slusher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

59 Scopus citations

Abstract

Neonatal jaundice is predominantly a benign condition that affects 60%.80% of newborns worldwide but progresses to potentially harmful severe hyperbilirubinaemia in some. Despite the proven therapeutic benefits of phototherapy for preventing extreme hyperbilirubinaemia, acute bilirubin encephalopathy or kernicterus, several low-income and middle-income countries (LMIC) continue to report high rates of avoidable exchange transfusions, as well as bilirubin-induced mortality and neurodevelopmental disorders. Considering the critical role of appropriate timing in treatment effectiveness, this review set out to examine the contributory factors to the burden of severe hyperbilirubinaemia and kernicterus based on the -ethree delays model-f described by Thaddeus and Maine in the 91 most economically disadvantaged LMICs with Gross National Income per capita .US$6000 and median human development index of 0.525 (IQR: 0.436.0.632). Strategies for addressing these delays are proposed including the need for clinical and public health leadership to curtail the risk and burden of kernicterus in LMICs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1117-1121
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Disease in Childhood: Education and Practice Edition
Volume99
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

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